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91  MyDSL Extensions / Apps / Re: Don't understand the burning app in dsl (cdw) on: July 08, 2013, 04:58:03 AM
Post attachments seem only to be viewable by members, so for the sake of accessibility, here it is as a quote:

Quote
cdw is an ncurses-based CD writer program, which uses cdrecord and mkisofs.
Thanks to Sharad Mittal, who wrote CDrecorder! I learned threads and regex's
from his code!

Install
-------
Copy cdw-0.2.x.tar.gz to your source directory, such as /usr/local/src and
'untar' the archive. Complie and install! Type:
 
tar -xzf cdw-0.2.x.tar.gz
cd ./cdw-0.2.x
./configure
make
make install

The configure script will detect all packages that are needed or suggested
for cdw. The cdrecord and mkisofs are always needed for compiling. Without these
programs cdw is useless. Cdw can work together with the following
programs:
cdda2wav: to save audio CDs to wav files.
lame: for saving tracks directly to mp3 instead of wav.
oggenc: for saving tracks directly to Ogg Vorbis format.

Configure automatically detects these programs if they are available. You
can also add the path of the programs to configure manually . For more information type:
'./configure --help'

The program automatically creates ~/.cdw.conf in your home directory. This
distribution package contains a default.conf file, which is a sample configuration.
The program automatically creates ~/.cdw directory, and makes symbolic links
from the selected files into this directory.

Install of GTK GUI
------------------
If you would like to use the GTK interface of cdw you must add --enable-gui
parameter for configure because cdw doesn't contain this feature in default.
Only the version 2 of GTK is supported. After you can use cdw in GTK
interface if you start the program with cdw -g.

Install of Disk catalog
-----------------------
If you would like to use the "Disk catalog" , you must install the mysqlclient
and mysqlclient-dev packages or sqlite and sqlite-dev before compiling. In
Debian Woody the name of these packages are: libmysqlclient10 and
libmysqlclient10-dev.  The configure will detect these packages and the
complied code will contain this feature. In this case, you will have a new tool
called cdwdic.  IMPORTANT! The /doc directory contains a cdw.sql file. You must
install this to your system for using the "Disk catalog". The installation
process is very simple:

With MySQL:
mysql <cdw.sql

With SQLite:
sqlite database_file < cdw_sqlite.sql

If you would like to install as an other user or the user has password
or by any chance the target system will be an other system, you can install
the database with the following method:

mysql -u username -p [password] -h hostname < cdw.sql

You will need to set these up in the options (see later).

Program parameters
------------------
cdws accept the following parameters:
-c | --catalog : running in "Disk catalog" mode.
-g | --gui     : running with GTK interface
-v | --version : display the version number of cdw
-h | --help    : display help

cdwdic knows the following parameters:
add <name> <no> <category> <date>: add new disk into catalog.
    <name> the name of disk
    <no> the number of disk (must be a number)
    <category> the name of the category (new categories are automatically created)
    <date> any date that you want to store. For example the date when the disk is added.
search <string>
    Search the <string> in the name of files and directories. Case insensitive!
show <name>
    Display the contents of <disk>.
list [-c <category>]
    Display the name and number of disks. With -c as an optional parameter
    only the disks in <category> category displayed.

Usage
-----
The menu:

Add files: Select files and directories for the cdimage. Press <space> to
select a file || directoy, or press <ESC> to quit dialog box.

Delete files: The select dialog is on the rigth side of the screen. If you
want to delete files from the image, use this dialog. Press <DEL> to delete
a file, or press <ESC> to leave this dialog.

Create image: Create a cdimage to "Imagefile" file from selected files. See Options later.
      
Copy CD image: Make an image from a CD in your drive.
      
Write image: If the "Write from image" is checked cdw will write the image to
the CD. If not checked, selected files are written direcly without image creation.
      
Copy data CD: Copy existing data CD from CD-ROM. (A reader and a writer devise is suggested :)
      
Blank CD-RW: Erase data from CD-RW (rewritable disc). In the options you can
select the type of blank: fast or full.
      
Options: see later.

Quit:    :)) Guess, what...

Options
-------
Here you can configure cdrecord and mkisofs, also cdda2wav,
lame, oggenc and MySQL, if accessible. Use the General and Other tabs.
All options are associated with a key. You can modify the options by pressing the corresponding key.
You can leave the input fields with ENTER or press ESC to quit the field without saving.
   
General properties (1):
SCSI device:
scsibus,target,lun. (For a SCSI-emulated IDE CDRW: 0,0,0)

Speed:
writing speed
     
Imagefile:
reading/writing image from/to this file

CD-ROM:
reading device (if you copy data CDs or creating CD images)

Logfile:
mkisofs & cdrecord write logs to this file

Volume ID:
adjust disc ID

Blank fast:
'cdrecord -blank=fast || all' (fast blanking|| full erase)

Eject when done:
eject cd tray when finished writing

Disk at once:
fixate disk after writing.

Joliet information:
generate Joliet directory information

Rock Ridge:
generate Rock Ridge directory information

Dummy write:
writing in dummy mode

Show log after write:
show the content of log after writing.

Auto show vol.:
show the volume id editor window before creating the image.

PAD:
Insert silence between audio tracks. See cdrecord(1) for more information.

Multi-session:
You can add new tracks to an existing CD. The previously stored data will not vanish.
IMPORTANT!!! You can create multi-session disks when you write the first
track in multi-session mode!

Burnproof:
Buffer Underrun Proof writing. If your writer supports this feature, you are suggested to
use it and check this box. In this case the program waits for data if the buffer is getting empty.

Other properties (2):


CD mount point:
The "Disk catalog" uses this property. "Disk catalog" will read the content of
disks from this directory. It is suggested to set up a directory as it is set
in the fstab for the cd-rw device. IMPORTANT!!! In the fstab it must be the cd-rw device,
because cdw will mount the disk under the directory specified there.

Auto disk catalog:
Add the disk to the catalog after writing.

MySQL host:
The name of the host where the cdw database installed. It is possible to use different
computers for cdw database and cdw (program). In this case cdw will handle the
data over the network. Here you must specify the name or the ip of the host where
you installed the database. If the program and the database are on the same computer,
use localhost (default).

MySQL user:
The name of the user who can access cdw database.

Audio directory:
cdw will rip tracks to this directory from audio CDs.

Stereo:
Rip audio tracks in stereo mode.

Bit per channel:
8 or 16

Echo to sound device:
While you are "copying" audio tracks from CD, the sound is also copied to soundcard. In this
way you can listen to the CD, but the speed will be 1x.

Encode to Ogg:
The output files will be in Ogg Vorbis format with real-time encoding.

High quality:
Generate VBR encoded files.

Encode to MP3:
The output files will be in MP3 format with real-time encoding.

Bitrate:
Constant bitrate: 128, 192 or 256 are possible values.

Press <F10> to save and exit or <ESC> to quit without saving.

The properties displayed gray are disabled. For example if the properties
of MP3 encoding are grey, it is suggested to check the lame program.

Keys
----
<F1>     Display help
<F2>     Display and edit "Volume ID"
<F3>     Edit additional parameters given to cdrecord, e.g.: -overburn
<F4>     Select CD size
<F5>|<L> View last logfile
<F6>     Information about raw disc material (cdrecord -atip) (overwrites last log :( )
<F10>    Display the GPL
<L>      Display the content of logfile
<E>      Eject CD-RW tray
<C>      Disk Catalog
<A>      Add disc to disk catalog (if installed)
<G>      Rip audio CD
<Q>      Quit

Rip audio CDs
-------------
If you enter into the ripper interface, cdw searches for an audio CD. If
found, it displays the number of audio tracks. Enter again if you changed the disk in the
tray. The 'start track' contains track number of starting track and cdw will
copy tracks until 'last track'. If you would like to rip only the 5th track, you must
specify 5 for starting and 5 for end track also. Changes are saved when you start
the rip procedure with the <G> key.

Disk catalog
------------
The Disk catalog is a standalone part of cdw. Previously we used 'dic' but it wasn't
too interactive and we started to develop our catalogizer. This disk catalog is based on
MySQL. You can enter into the catalog interface in to ways: pressing <C> in main menu of
cdw or start cdw with -c (or --catalog) parameter. You can navigate with the left and right
arrows on the keypad between the menu and the categorized files. The main level always displays
the name of categories. Inside these lists you can find the disks, directories and files.
You can enter into the the category, disk or directory with <ENTER>. You can go one
level up with <BACKSPACE>. The bottom of screen displays information about currently
selected item.

Disk catalog menu:
Show all disk: display all disks without categories in disk number order. You can go
back with <BACKSPACE> or with / key.

Add disk: add new disk to catalog.
1. Insert the disk into CD-RW.
2. Enter the name of disk.
3. Enter the NUMBER of disk.
4. Enter the name of category which will contain the disk.
You can quit the 'add disk' procedure by pressing <ESC>. If the category doesn't exist yet,
cdw will create it. cdw will mount the disk if you set the fstab item with
correct device name and mountpoint.

Search: you can search in the names of files and directories. Enter the string that you
want to find and the result of search will be displayed. cdw will search in all categories,
disks and directorie. After the search you can see all disks which contain the specified
string. The program will show the search results until requesting "Show all disk". The
top of the screen (the search label) informs you about the type of information on the screen.
If checked you can see the result of search else you can see everything.

Delete: delete a disk or category from the catalog. By deleting a disk or category, all items in that
container will be deleted, too! As you delete a category, all disks are in that category are deleted,too!
The program will asks you before deletion whether you are sure to delete that item.

Quit: exit from disk catalog. If you start cdw with -c or --catalog parameter, you will exit
from the program, otherwise you will go back to the cdw main menu.

Keys:
F1     - Display help window
->     - Enter into catalogized files window
<-     - Enter into main menu of disk catalog.
ENTER  - Change between category, disk or directory.
BSPACE - Go up one level
DEL    - Delete disk or category
A      - Add disk to catalog
S      - Show all
Q      - Exit from disk catalog

Accessibility
-------------
Mail bug reports to <vbali@linuxforum.hu>
Latest release: http://cdw.sourceforge.net

Aug 26, 2003
92  MyDSL Extensions / Apps / Re: Don't understand the burning app in dsl (cdw) on: July 07, 2013, 06:33:20 AM
CD burning in DSL is a common problem, so I decided to dig up the documentation for the early version of the cdw program that is included in DSL. Attached is the readme file that I took from the source archive I downloaded, it describes the program's functions in some depth.

As an alternative, one may always use the "cdrecord" command in the terminal. Simply type cdrecord, any options you desire, and then the path to the image file you want to burn. On some machines, you might need to specify the SCSI ID of your CD/DVD burner using the option "dev=". Most commonly, this is 0,0,0 but it can easily be something else. To check the SCSI ID of your drive do "cdrecord -scanbus" and read off the number that corresponds with the drive you want to use, then insert it after "dev=" on the command such as "cdrecord dev=0,1,0 /dir/file.iso". Check the other options listed with "cdrecord --help" for more control over the burning process.
93  Damn Small Linux / Laptops / Re: Problem reading cylinder 0, expected 18532?, read -1 after format floppy disk on: July 07, 2013, 06:11:55 AM
DSL hasn't had a major release since around 2008, so even after a few years, your version is probably pretty close to the current one. Your version of Bon Echo is the same as mine which came with DSL 4.4.10.

Apt-get is for updating individual programs, not the whole operating system. Even for updating individual software it has limited use because the Debian Woody package archive it would download software from hasn't been updated for years. You should be able to update the version of DSL on the memory stick by simply copying files to it with another machine (perhaps making a backup of its contents before hand). Have a look in the DSL Wiki for more info on updating.

I don't think GRUB can read from a CD without additional software. If you want to give it a try anyway, make sure to make a copy of your menu.lst file and place it out of the way so that you can restore it if things get messed up. Did you try looking at the machine's BIOS settings to see if you can enable CD booting?
94  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: internet connection - wired on: July 04, 2013, 10:00:59 AM
If "eth0" shows up in the ifconfig listing, then a driver has been loaded, however it may not be working. From a quick Google search, your computer looks like a pretty new model. The version of the Linux kernal included in DSL is pretty old, some more modern hardware drivers aren't included with it.

Look up the chipset of your computer's motherboard and search for when Linux driver software was developed for it. You might be able to load the drivers as modules on startup, but that relies on them supporting the linux Kernel version used (2.4.31).

If the support isn't available, you might want to try DSL-N which uses the 2.6 kernel. Or you could wait for John to release his promised new version of DSL that sounds much like a new DSL-N, supporting newer hardware but bloating the distro somewhat in terms of size and resource usage.
95  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Start program in terminal in its own directory from DSL menu link on: June 16, 2013, 03:02:52 AM
I've had this problem for a while, but I've finally admitted defeat at trying to solve it myself.

I have a Java program (replicatorG) that will only launch from a terminal in its own directory. I am trying to launch it from the DSL menu using aterm, but so far nothing has worked.

Here is a list of what I have tried, not in order:
  • Launching it using the aterm option "-e" followed by either replicatorg (directory specified in $PATH) or the full path name. Window appears for a moment and then closes with an error.
  • Launching it without aterm by enterring "replicatorg" or the full path as the program in .jwmrc. Nothing happens when clicked.
  • Creating a two-line script that first "cd"s to replicatorg's directory, then runs replicatorg. Thereafter entering this into .jwmrc so that it is executed by aterm. I since learnt that scripts can't change their directory, so this did the same as the first attempt.
  • Placing an "alias" command in .bashrc that causes the directory to be changed to that of replicatorg with the command "repgdir", then using "repgdir" where the "cd" command was in the script from above. This didn't change a thing, seems Bash is too smart for these sort of tricks.
  • Give up. Simply open a terminal and type "replicatorg" manually to start it each time. This works, but severely harms my pride.

I think I read once online about ways to do this with other distros, but it was going to be too much trouble to modify DSL to use the same methods.

Well any help will be greatly appreciated. If I ever discover an anwser to my problem, I'll post it here.
96  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: Need Help Installing/Running Wireshark on: June 16, 2013, 02:17:50 AM
There are a few options for how to do this. Perhaps the most user-friendly is to use the MyDSL browser. Open the DSL menu, go to MyDSL and click on the link to the browser. Once it is open, click on "Install Local" in the top right corner, then navigate to where you have the UCI file and select it. Once it has unpacked, a link for your program will likely appear below the one for the MyDSL browser.

Note that a UCI will not install itself permanently, and will be lost when you turn off your computer. Look in the DSL wiki for how to amke it load on startup.
97  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: Tor does not work on: June 16, 2013, 01:04:52 AM
I'm a bit late with this reply I know, but I only just learnt the details of how Tor works so I figure I'm now less likely to say something meaningless.

It looks like the Tor binary was compiled on a machine with libssl version 0.9.8 installed. That package has version 0.9.7 and DSL comes as standard with version 0.9.6 (according to the packages list on the website). So the package author should have included their libssl with their Tor package, however as they didn't, your only option is to compile something yourself.

Check if a version of Tor you're happy with will work with libssl 0.9.6 (already in DSL) or 0.9.7. If so, download the Tor source and compile it yourself (info on how to do this is online, look in the old forum archives). If not, download the source for a version of Tor and compatible version of Openssl, then compile them (Openssl first, Tor afterwards). If you get the latest version of Tor, it will probably need more dependancies than Openssl (made clear as errors when you run the configure script), these again (unless already in the My-DSL respository) will need to be downloaded and compiled before you compile Tor.

Good luck! If it's your first time compiling, just think what you'll learn!
98  Damn Small Linux / HD Install / Re: Apt-get update doesn't work!!! on: June 16, 2013, 12:28:17 AM
You do realise that the Debian 3 "Woody" packages are no longer updated?

As DSL doesn't support later Debian packages and the My-DSL respository is no longer frequently updated, I usually compile software myself if I need a new version.

As for using the old Woody packages, they are available on the web from "archive.debian.net". I don't remember trying that site with apt-get though.
99  Damn Small Linux / USB booting / Re: HELP HP N54 Microserver won't boot DSL (Newbie) on: June 01, 2013, 12:19:55 AM
Quote
I am at a bit of a quandry as I have also got Lubuntu 13 loaded and I am wondering if it's easier to strip lubuntu down even further or if it's footprint is small enough, then it may be happier with modern hardware.

Well I would have thought that all you'd need in this case was support for SATA HDDs (boot option "sata", in case you didn't know) and your Network Card. DSL should support these well enough, so I don't see what difference it would make.

Lubuntu will have a better range of packages though, so you probably won't need to compile anything. On the other hand, stripping stuff out might be a tricky task, and you won't bring it down to a DSL size/resource usage. Do you know about TinyCore? It's something of a spin-off of DSL that has better modern hardware support and comes with practically no pre-installed software but a GUI and package downloader (depending on what version you choose). The idea is that you download everything you want from the package archive. The archive is more up to date than DSL's, but far smaller than the Ubuntu one that Lubuntu uses.

Quote
I Like the look of DSL and especially the top right hand side Systems specs App (Not sure what that's called?)

Yes I like the DSL interface as well. I like the more basic approach to that of the mainstream distros. The desktop status program is called "Torsmo" (torsmo.sourceforge.net), it can be configured quite extensively by editing the config file "/home/dsl/.torsmorc" (remember to change user to "root", otherwise you won't have permission to modify it).
100  Non-DSL Topics / water cooler / Re: Ignore on: May 30, 2013, 07:13:56 AM
Don't know of an ignore button. You've probably noticed the "Report to Moderator" button, but I think the problem should be obvious enough anyway.

By the way, posting with the title "Ignore" isn't the best way to get a topic noticed.
101  Damn Small Linux / USB booting / Re: HELP HP N54 Microserver won't boot DSL (Newbie) on: May 30, 2013, 07:02:39 AM
I actually installed DSL on a Proliant from ~2005. These "Microservers" look like rather different beasts though. Something like a server designed by people who normally work on desktop PCs.

Anyway, as for booting, as long as you're an "almost complete newbie", have you set up the BIOS for USB/CD booting? Usually this is called "Boot Priorities" or something similar in the BIOS settings. For how to get to the BIOS settings, look at the manual. USB or CD have to be before the HDD/s for them to boot.

DSL comes with BetaFTPd, but it's hard to find docs for (I might have found some information once, but I'd have to check on another computer, ask if you want me to check for it). It doesn't have a GUI either, so you might want to look for something more like FileZilla. ProFTPd doesn't have a GUI either (at least not as standard, there might be separate interfaces available), it is much easier to find docs for though.

can't help you with remote access in DSL though (haven't tried it), try looking in the MyDSL repository for remote access programs.
102  Damn Small Linux / Laptops / Re: Problem reading cylinder 0, expected 18532?, read -1 after format floppy dis on: May 26, 2013, 12:25:43 AM
The desktop right corner shows that I'm running linux 2.4.31 on i686.

Ah, you do know that 2.4.31 is the version of your Linux kernel, not of DSL? That kernel version is the same one that comes with the latest DSL. To find your DSL version, go to the DSL menu, then "System>System Stats". The DSL version should be printed in the top line of the CPU tab that opens with the stats window.

As for the boot floppy, looks like you'd better try another floppy disk, or failing that, another drive. Though having just looked up the specs on your model, it should be able to boot to a CD anyway. Check your BIOS boot settings and make sure it is trying to boot to the CD drive.

By the way, 256MB RAM should be fine for CD burning, though I admit that the cdw program is quite tricky. I found a webpage that explained the process, but I don't know which computer I bookmarked it on.
103  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: text cursor dissapearing in text boxes, using DSL-4.4.10, please help on: May 21, 2013, 07:01:53 AM
I'm afraid I haven't seen your problem before, but I can say that the Ebay search bar doesn't work at the best of times with the old Firefox that comes with DSL. I search by modifying the text in the URL.

The other things should work though.

Presumably you compiled "Processing", so try "make uninstall" and if the problem goes away, play with the configure options to see if you can disable what's causing the problem for the next install. Or if uninstalling doesn't work, do the same and just keep re-installing DSL, it's usually fairly quick on modern PCs.
104  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: configuring packages on: April 22, 2013, 07:35:35 AM
Source Code is the common way to distribute programs for Linux so that they can be used with a range of different distributions. If a project on Sourceforge offers a Linux version, it probably has the source package available, but many linux programs from elsewhere on the net will have them too. They usually have the "tar.gz" extension (or tar.xz, tar.bz2). Note though that the ".tar.gz" packages in the MyDSL repository are not Source Code packages.

For your second problem, if you downloaded a package for the program you're using, it might be looking for GIMP-print when it isn't installed on your computer. If you compiled it, you should check for a "./configure" option to disable GIMP-print. If the program can't run without GIMP-print for some reason, you might need to install it, though I'm not sure if it is compatible with DSL.
105  Damn Small Linux / Other Help Topics / Re: configuring packages on: April 19, 2013, 10:28:29 PM
"./configure" is a script included with most source code packages for Linux. Unlike the other commands, it exists in the directory of the program you want to compile (hence why you type "./" before it). You don't download it separately.

Often simply typing "./configure" will set things up automatically as required for your system. However you can type "./configure --help", or to scroll through the text, "./configure --help | less", to see a list of options that may be added to the "./configure" line in order to make specific choices about the compillation.

Also, just a note that gcc doesn't actually control the "make" command, there is a specific program called "make" for that, but gcc is used by it to compile the package.
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